law grrrl

law student...finding solace in solitude. queer chamorrita, learning the art of practicing self-love. CROSSING BORDERS on the daily, socalifas por vida, puromexicoenmicorazón.

Sin duda soy yo un bosque y una noche de árboles oscuros: sin embargo, quien no tenga miedo de mi oscuridad encontrará tambien taludes de rosas debajo de mis cipreses.

—Friedrich Nietzsche, Asi Hablo Zaratustra (via entreporrosybotellasyotevi)

(Source: faasnursoskirr, via artesany)

Mujer de Dios
profeta de hierba
mujer de la edad del tiempo
que hace honor a los muertos santos
mujer de Dios
mujer de la obscuridad
mujer de tiempos sagrados
diosa del mundo de muertos
venas y carne, tu fruto ha crecido
la tierra tu sangre siempre beberás

—Lila Downs- Nueve Hierba (via mujeristaxicana)

(Source: humble-vibes, via mujeristaxicana)

La libertad es como la mañana. Hay quienes esperan dormidos a que llegue, pero hay quienes desvelan y caminan la noche para alcanzarla.

—Subcomandante Marcos, EZLN (via elpoetaefimero)

(via mujeristaxicana)

torogozando:

I just bought this book for a few dollars. I can’t believe the price. I have been falling in love with Sophia Al-Maria’s art and when I found out she writes like I just had to get it. Here’s the description from the back of the book:
“When Sophia Al-Maria’s mother sends her away from rainy Washington State to stay with her husband’s desert-dwelling Bedouin family in Qatar, she intends it to be a sort of teenage cultural boot camp. What her mother doesn’t know is that there are some things about growing up that are universal. In Qatar, Sophia is faced with a new world she’d only imagined as a child. She sets out to find her freedom, even in the most unlikely of places.
Both family saga and coming-of-age story, The Girl Who Fell to Earth takes readers from the green valleys of the Pacific Northwest to the dunes of the Arabian Gulf and on to the sprawling chaos of Cairo. Struggling to adapt to her nomadic lifestyle, Sophia is haunted by the feeling that she is perpetually in exile: hovering somewhere between two families, two cultures, and two worlds. She must make a place for herself—a complex journey that includes finding young love in the Arabian Gulf, rebellion in Cairo, and, finally, self-discovery in the mountains of Sinai.
The Girl Who Fell to Earth heralds the arrival of an electric new talent and takes us on the most personal of quests: the voyage home.” 

torogozando:

I just bought this book for a few dollars. I can’t believe the price. I have been falling in love with Sophia Al-Maria’s art and when I found out she writes like I just had to get it. Here’s the description from the back of the book:

When Sophia Al-Maria’s mother sends her away from rainy Washington State to stay with her husband’s desert-dwelling Bedouin family in Qatar, she intends it to be a sort of teenage cultural boot camp. What her mother doesn’t know is that there are some things about growing up that are universal. In Qatar, Sophia is faced with a new world she’d only imagined as a child. She sets out to find her freedom, even in the most unlikely of places.

Both family saga and coming-of-age story, The Girl Who Fell to Earth takes readers from the green valleys of the Pacific Northwest to the dunes of the Arabian Gulf and on to the sprawling chaos of Cairo. Struggling to adapt to her nomadic lifestyle, Sophia is haunted by the feeling that she is perpetually in exile: hovering somewhere between two families, two cultures, and two worlds. She must make a place for herself—a complex journey that includes finding young love in the Arabian Gulf, rebellion in Cairo, and, finally, self-discovery in the mountains of Sinai.

The Girl Who Fell to Earth heralds the arrival of an electric new talent and takes us on the most personal of quests: the voyage home.” 

(via laprofesorarevolucionaria)

Con la tarde
se cansaron los dos o tres colores del patio.
Esta noche, la luna, el claro círculo,
no domina su espacio.
Patio, cielo encauzado.
El patio es el declive
por el cual se derrama el cielo en la casa.

—“Un patio”, Jorge Luis Borges. (via villings)

(via villings)